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's economy has continued to grow while the rest of europe has slowed. >> that growth is now so minimal that economists say 2013 next year could see a return to recession. still, german businesses shrugging off that possibility. >> business managers are upbeat about their future. >> german business leaders are optimistic that exports will remain strong, and the latest figures back that up. consumer confidence is also surprisingly robust. all the talk of a crisis in the eurozone does not seem to have dented people's desire to shock, but growth overall is beginning to falter -- the talk of a crisis does not seem to have dented people's desire to shop. the eurozone as a whole has fare worse with zero growth at the start of the year and then downhill from there. that has a knock on effect for german companies. so far, though, the german economy is weathering the storm. >> that news sent stocks in germany higher in what has been a bit of a winning streak recently. our correspondent has more from frankfurt. >> traders did not spend much time looking back on the slowdown of the german economy,
to go into the real economy. >> as we saw in our report, greeks are out protesting against this deal. what with the public like to see instead? >> i think the biggest thing they would like is some sense that the unemployment issue is going to be addressed. the protests we saw today were mainly involving municipal workers, city hall workers. not just in athens, as about 2/3 of city halls around the country were shut. many of those workers will be laid off between now and the end of the year. the government is finding it very hard to get the mayors of those city halls to send in the list of names of people who have to be laid off. >> thanks so much for the update. germany is a top lender to greece, and lawmakers are expected to approve the release of berlin's contribution immediately. still, there are deep suspicions that talks of a debt write-down have been delayed until after next year's german elections. >> the deal would be put to vote on thursday or friday. >> it is not an easy sell for the defense of the idea of letting greece buy back its bonds at below market value. >> it is im
. >> translator: i promise to become the first president to democratize the economy and establish a sound welfare system through a new type of politics. >> moon also talked about >> moon also talked about entrepreneur-turned-politician ahn cheol-soo. ahn dropped out of the race last week to give moon a better chance for victory when voters head to the polls on december 19th. moon said he'll never forget the sacrifice. he asked ahn's supporters to back him. >>> earlier shery ahn spoke with kengo okamoto who has covered south korea's last two presidential elections. >> kengo, park and moon running neck and neck. what are south koreans looking for in their next leader? >> yes, shery. their biggest concern is growing economic equality. they blame congress glom rats. these groups or big companies dominate south korea's economy. critics say they made it hard for smaller companies to succeed. moon has said one solution is to reintroduce limits on how conglomerates can invest. he says that would create room for smaller companies to grow. >> and what does park say? she's known to be more conservative. >>
an agreement by year's end. such a situation is feared to trigger a plunge in the economy. panetta warned that defense spending will be subject to drastic cuts if lawmakers failed to reach a consensus. >> the worst thing that could happen from my perspective is that they just kick the can down the road. all that would wind up doing is continuing to present a shadow over the defense department and for that matter, the rest of government. >> the defense department is already planning to reduce its budget by about $500 billion over the coming ten years. panetta has voiced concern that further cuts could undermine barack obama's new defense strategy that lays more emphasis on the asia pacific region. >>> japanese officials are scratching their heads about how to deal with sluggish trade. sales to foreign countries have plunged leaving japan in a trade deficit for the fourth straight month. finance ministry officials released preliminary figures shortly before the markets opened. the deficit came in at $6.7 billion. exports fell by 6.5% from a year earlier. exports have fallen five months in a
of the arguments when it comes to the you relate to the economy. -- most of the arguments when it comes to the e you relate to the economy -- most of the arguments when it comes to the eu. >> i think we're just failing to allow a lot of the time, and then our own country is suffering. we're too busy dealing with everyone else. am i think the -- >> i think the eu has a lot to do to get itself out of trouble. >> those in favor of the eu are in the minority here, but they are part of. one growth organizes cultural exchanges -- one group organizes cultural exchanges. they are going to supply the local christmas market with wine from their local german city. >> i feel part of europe, rather than british particularly, but then may be i am the odd one. who is to say. >> although he is a fervent european, he thinks he is likely to remain the odd one out for some time to come. >> the government situation, and employment, the general economic situation, and generally, you look for scapegoats, and europe is a good scapegoat. >> even today, many britons think the enemy is on the continent in brussels. them
dealing with the economy. 21% replied reforming social security. and 11% cited energy policy, including the use of nuclear power. the disapproval rate for prime minister yoshihiko noda's cabinet hit a record high at 64%. that's a three percentage point increase from a week ago. the approval rate remained unchanged at 22%. voters were also asked who they would prefer as prime minister. the two choices were the incumbent yoshihiko noda, who heads the democratic party, or shinzo abe, leader of the opposition's liberal democratic party. 21% of respondents chose noda. 26% favored abe. but almost half, or 49%, said they wanted neither. >>> japan's top government spokesperson says officials are gathering information in anticipation of a possible missile launch by north korea. u.s. satellite images indicate north korea recently transported what are thought to be long-range ballistic missile parts. japan chief cabinet secretary osamu fujimura says his government closely monitors missile-related activities in north korea. >> translator: we will work harder to gather and analyze information and wi
economy -- due to concerns. >> there are talks in brussels, and it was on the minds of traders. we have this summary from the frankfurt stock exchange. >> the negotiations about the rescue package for greece our way and down on the share markets at the beginning of this week. traders are hoping that there will not be a long term -- that there will be a long-term solution but only the euro showed that investors seem to be rather optimistic. the hero has been quite strong today. optimism also for the german economy. the german consumer confidence has been stronger than expected. some investors hope now that german consumers buy more christmas presents than they have before. >> a quick look at some market numbers now. dax closing down 0.25%. euro stoxx down. the dow jones is currently down about 0.5%. the euro was trading for $1.2961. swiss bank ubs has been fined 37 million euro for regulation and failures lead into a rogue trader losing billions for the company. >> the employee was convicted of fraud dance that -- sentenced to seven years in prison. they describe the risk control systems
in the minimum wage. the indonesian economy grew by 6.5% last year, but with that growth comes a higher cost of living. demonstrators carried signs lambasting a 2011 law that will require salary reductions to cover social security and health benefits. the law is expected to go into effect in 2014, but workers say those costs should remain the government's responsibility. similar prothave been recently held in other cities around the country as workers urge the government to protect them. >>> phuket is an idyllic location in southern thailand has plans to lure a segment of the muslims who make up nearly 25% of the world's population. we have more. >> reporter: eight million travellers a year head to phu t phuket. ♪ >> reporter: one of phuket's annual tourism events shows what the island has to offer guests. visiting is the secretary gener general. he threw his weight behind the plan. >> if we want to cater for all sorts of clients and tourists, we need to be sensitive to their demands. >> more restaurants in phuket serve halal which means perishable. this restaurant said diners can eat in
- largest economy is starting to pick up after months of slowdown. also fueling optimism is a slew of positive trade, investment, and sales figures. it is the moment that shook the financial markets -- the collapse of lehman brothers investment bank back in 2008. >> many thought all was lost for its german subsidiary company as well, which went bust as well, but that has not been the case. the company's liquidators have raised more than 15 billion euros. that means it could be 80% of its creditors' demands, however, some hedge fund managers are demanding more. well, it is very dark here in northern europe right now, but there is something you can do about that, mainly with electric light, believe it or not. >> after the break. >> thanks for staying with us. >> welcome back. we take a look now at the biggest terrorism case in germany in tickets, one with allegations of a cover-up and a new not to sell suspected of going on a racially motivated killing spree. >> the national socialist underground went undetected for years, but a parliamentary committee is questioning a former interio
and work there, a growing number are educated professionals contributing to the economy. according to a survey, 1/3 of swiss people are against this influx. this person experienced this firsthand when he came to zurich six years ago. he still does not feel at home. and for good reason. >> you notice being socially excluded from groups, not being talked to, sometimes being disadvantaged it work. not openly, but behind closed doors. >> well-off members of the swiss-german club are taking a different route and getting to know each other amidst the mountains. the self-help groups think the founder of the club is out of line. >> they should get in touch and then they can see how to tackle this a little more amicably. >> some germans' bad experiences have broken down the harmony even here, especially in the case of bosses. >> you need order. you have to take people and colleagues with you, and then it works. there is no working order here. >> a short introduction. >> hello, everyone. [laughter] >> it is his turn to improvise. he slips into the role of a swiss man bad mouthing germans. >>
billion bailout money from the e you in return for implementing a rigid austerity package. the economy has shrunk for the past three years. unemployment and poverty are on the rise, and there's no end in sight to the economic slump. soup kitchens have opened up all over lisbon. the number of needy is growing. so is resentment to those who have placed the conditions on the portuguese government. >> we are under occupation. not a military one, but we are occupied all the same period in many ways, life today resembles life under a dictatorship more than in a democracy. >> members of the military gather at this historic monetary -- monastery for a service. it is a time for quiet contemplation, but the military bishop also expresses the thoughts that are going through many mines. "the situation is explosive," he says, "and uprising can no longer be ruled out." so far, the portuguese have patiently fulfilled all the requirements meted out by distant brussels, but their patience is wearing thin, and so is the military's. >> many officers are beginning to question their treatment by europe and won
have difficulties in meeting the payments on other bonds. latin america's third biggest economy could be headed for another debt crisis. >> they certainly have the power to send the financial markets into a tailspin. we are, of course, talking about the ratings agencies. >> after years of dithering and delays, brussels has agreed to a set of controls designed to limit their influence, but critics call it a miniature reform that misses the mark. >> weather it is greece, spain, portugal, or italy, eurozone crisis countries have had credit ratings consistently downgraded by the major ratings agencies. a lower credit rating usually means countries have to pay higher interest on any loans they take out. they can also cause turbulence in financial markets. the european union has introduced new rules to limit their effect. other agencies will have to publish their ratings outside of stock exchange opening hours. i also have to disclose the criteria by which they make decisions, and the rules should make it easier for agencies to be sued if they have made errors when reading a country's credi
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12